Getting into Grad School

Getting into Grad School: GMAT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT

GMAT

The Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is designed to measure applicants’ readiness for business school. It is offered at many locations and dates throughout the year, and applicants may take the GMAT up to five times in a twelve-month period, though not more than once every 16 days.

Content

The GMAT is comprised of four sections: Analytical Writing, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, and Verbal. The Analytical Writing section consists of an essay analyzing an argument. The Integrated Reasoning section contains sets of written information, diagrams, charts, and graphs, followed by questions that draw from multiple sources. The Quantitative section incorporates arithmetic, algebra, and geometry concepts into two types of questions: problem solving and data sufficiency. The Verbal section contains reading comprehension, sentence improvement, and critical reading questions.

Scoring

The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test. In the multiple-choice sections (Verbal and Quantitative), test takers are presented with average-level questions at the beginning of the test, and their performance on each question determines the difficulty level of subsequent questions. The Verbal and Quantitative sections are both scored on a scale from 0 to 60. The essay is scored twice on a scale from 0 to 6, and the final Analytical Writing score is determined by the average of those two scores. The Integrated Reasoning section is scored on a scale from 1 to 8.

In addition to the section scores, you will also receive a total score between 200 and 800. Only the Verbal and Quantitative section scores factor into the total score.

Preparing for the GMAT

To discuss the best approach to your GMAT preparation, call us and let us know when you are planning to take the test.

Test Dates and Registration

The GMAT is offered by appointment at various locations throughout the year. To register for the GMAT, click here.

GRE

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is a computer-adaptive test that is used by universities to measure prospective graduate students’ qualifications and determine merit-based financial aid. It is offered at many locations and dates throughout the year, and applicants may take the GRE up to five times in a twelve-month period, though not more than once every 21 days.

Content

The GRE is comprised of three components: Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing. There are two Verbal Reasoning sections that contain reading comprehension, text completion, and sentence equivalence questions. The two Quantitative Reasoning sections incorporate arithmetic, algebra, and geometry concepts into three types of questions: problem solving, quantitative comparisons, and data interpretation. The Analytical Writing section consists of two essays, one that analyzes an issue and one that analyzes an argument.

Scoring

The GRE is a computer-adaptive test. In the first section of both the Verbal and Quantitative components, test takers are presented with average-level questions, and their performance on that section determines the difficulty level of the second section. Students receive a point for each correct answer; there is no penalty for incorrect answers. Raw scores are then converted to scaled scores, which range from 130 to 170 for both the Verbal and Quantitative sections. The essays are individually graded on a scale from 0 to 6; the average of the two scores comprises the final Analytical Writing score.

Preparing for the GRE

To discuss the best approach to your GRE preparation, call us and let us know when you are planning to take the test.

Test Dates and Registration

The GRE is offered by appointment at various locations throughout the year. To register for the GRE, click here.

LSAT

The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is designed to measure the critical reading and analytical thinking skills of law school applicants. It is offered four times throughout the year. Applicants may take the LSAT up to three times in a two-year period.

Content

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is comprised of five multiple-choice sections and an essay. Two Logical Reasoning sections require students to analyze arguments; one Reading Comprehension section tests a student’s ability to think critically about reading passages; and one Analytical Reasoning section requires students to make several deductions based on a given set of circumstances. Each LSAT also contains one Variable, or experimental, section that is not scored.

Scoring

Points are given for correct answers, and no points are deducted for incorrect answers. A raw score is translated to a scaled score between 120 and 180. The essay is not graded, but it is sent to schools for review.

Preparing for the LSAT

To discuss the best approach to your LSAT preparation, call us and let us know when you are planning to take the test.

Test Dates and Registration

To register for the LSAT, click here.

MCAT

The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a computer-based test designed to assess knowledge of scientific concepts as well as problem solving, critical thinking, and writing skills. Most students take the MCAT during their junior or senior year of undergraduate college. Applicants may take the MCAT up to seven times, but no more than four times over two consecutive testing years and no more than three times in any one testing year.

Content

The MCAT is comprised of four multiple-choice sections: Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems; Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems; Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior; and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.

Scoring

Each of the multiple-choice sections is graded on a scale from 118 to 132. These scores are then added together for a total score between 472 and 528.

Preparing for the MCAT

To discuss the best approach to your MCAT preparation, call us and let us know when you are planning to take the test.

Test Dates and Registration

The MCAT is offered on various dates throughout the year. For more information on scheduling and registration, click here.